The making of Captain America – Civil War (2016)

A gallery of behind the scenes set pics from the making of Captain America: Civil War. The latest Marvel flick was shot over an 84 day schedule, with most of the production’s sets built at Pinewood Atlanta Studios. The climactic airport battle mixed footage from Atlanta with location work at Germany’s Leipzig/Halle Airport (for more info on the scene check out this Hollywood Reporter story).

Unlike the majority of the film – which was shot on the Arri Alexa XT Plus – the airport set piece was lensed with the Arri Alexa 65, which will be used for the entirety of the upcoming Avengers: Infinity War. For more info on the technical aspects of Civil War, track down the June issue of American Cinematographer Magazine.

Click here for more Deep Fried Movies “behind the scenes” gallery.

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Pic of the Day: Pressbook for My Darling Clementine (1946)

Pressbook for My Darling Clementine, John FordThe front and back covers of the exhibitors pressbook for 20th Century Fox’s 1946 release of John Ford’s My Darling Clementine. Henry Fonda’s performance as Wyatt Earp marked his return to the screen after a three-year hitch in the Navy. The actor took another extended hiatus – this time nearly eight years – to focus on stage work following Ford’s 1948 western Fort Apache.

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Interview: Forsaken director Jon Cassar

The reformed gunfighter unable to escape his past. The greedy land baron. The gentleman hired gun with his own code of ethics. In the 1950s, these were among the most familiar tropes of the Western genre, repeated ad infinitum in an era when oaters dominated prime time television and filmmakers such as John Ford, Budd Boetticher, Delmer Daves, and Anthony Mann cranked out horse operas at the pace of one per year.

Those days are long gone, distant enough that the archetypes in a nostalgic Western such as Forsaken feel as welcomingly familiar as slipping on an old pair of boots. In Forsaken – now out on VOD and in select theaters – Kiefer Sutherland is the reluctant gunfighter, Brian Cox the greedy land baron, and Michael Wincott the genteel mercenary. Eager to leave behind his violent past and reconcile with his preacher father (Donald Sutherland), Kiefer’s John Henry Clayton heads home to Wyoming only to find the town’s farmers being forced off their land. Anyone who knows their Randolph Scotts from their Ben Johnsons can guess that Sutherland’s six-shooters won’t stay holstered for long.

Forsaken marks the feature film directorial debut of Jon Cassar following a 30-year career in television, highlighted by his Emmy-winning work as director and producer on Fox’s 24. Cassar spoke to Deep Fried Movies about making that leap. Continue Reading ›

Pic of the Day: On the set of Squirm (1976)

Behind the scenes of Jeff Liberman's Squirm

Actor R.A. Dow, chest-deep in worms on the set of the 1976 revenge of nature flick Squirm. Another cult movie offering from Just Before Dawn and Blue Sunshine director Jeff Lieberman, Squirm finds the slimy subterranean inhabitants of a small town turned bloodthirsty when a set of downed power cables jolts them with electricity.

The pic above is part of an album of Squirm production stills that Lieberman recently posted to his Facebook page. Check out the film’s trailer below, from the Blu-
ray release by Shout! Factory.

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Behind the Scenes: Anomalisa (2014)

I recently had the chance to interview Joe Passarelli, cinematographer of the stop-motion animation film Anomalisa (2014), for Filmmaker Magazine. Oscar-nominated for Best Animated Feature, Anomalisa was shot over the span of two years on an army of 18 Canon 7D cameras – one for each miniature set. Below is a quote from my Filmmaker piece highlighting the challenges of shooting stop-motion. Then continue onward for a gallery of production stills.

“We had one shot where the camera slowly pushed in that took five or six months to animate. Each frame, the camera is moving less than an eighth of an inch. So when you’re shooting something over that period of time, you’re going to deal with all of those technical things that you mentioned — people bumping cameras, people bumping lights, bumping props. When that would happen we would have to go on to set and try to fix it. But if something was really unfixable, then visual effects would come in and we’d talk with them to devise a plan. But even beyond the animator or somebody hitting something on the set, every morning we would come in and we would turn on the lights and the sets would look like an earthquake happened. Because it was cold in the morning but the night before it was warm because the lights had been on for 12 hours, the wood would breathe and (as the temperature) changed things on set would shift. Then sometimes the camera would sag slightly if the lens was heavier and it was on a motion-control rig. It was a very interesting process to figure out.” – Joe Passarelli

 

Five Frames: Bone Tomahawk cinematographer Benji Bakshi

The Film: Bone Tomahawk
The Cinematographer: Benji Bakshi
The Tools: Shot on Red Epic Dragon
The Plot: In this western, four disparate men (sheriff Kurt Russell and deputy Richard Jenkins, accompanied by Patrick Wilson and Matthew Fox) embark on a rescue mission to retrieve Wilson’s wife from a tribe of cannibalistic cave dwellers.
Further Reading: Check out my interview with Bone Tomahawk director S. Craig Zahler for Filmmaker Magazine.

How was your experience with the Red Epic Dragon?
Benji Bakshi: The Dragon was a serious improvement from previous models. Color was much more accurate and the latitude has improved, which was essential for our day exteriors. As always I tend to underexpose with Red, which gives more room in the highlights. The Dragon was improved in the shadows as well versus previous models, but in testing I saw noise at the toe. Knowing we intended to ride the edge of darkness, I set up a LUT to crush the shadows, which forced me to put light there. On set sometimes people would mention it was very dark, but I knew when the LUT was removed it would reveal lots of detail in the shadows, which proved to be the case. Normally I lift the shadows by using atmosphere (haze) but since our sets weren’t airtight the haze would have drifted in shot so in general I didn’t use it. So the LUT took the place of physical atmosphere to put light into the shadows. Continue Reading ›

The Posters of Pam Grier

With Olive Films set to release Blu-Rays of Coffy, Foxy Brown and Friday Foster this week, it seemed like an opportune moment to revisit the posters of Pam Grier’s trailblazing run of 1970s action vehicles.

Many of these posters come from the fantastic genre archive Wrong Side of the Art. After lying dormant for more than a year, the site is updating again. Glad to have them back.

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