Pic of the Day: Behind the scenes of David Lynch’s Dune (1984)

Behind the scenes of David Lynch's Dune

American Cinematographer recently shared an interview with Freddie Francis from its March 1998 issue that included the photo above from the set of David Lynch’s Dune. Francis, a two-time Oscar winner, also shot Lynch’s The Elephant Man and The Straight Story.

It’s an incredible piece that covers the breadth of Francis’ career, from his beginnings as a clapper boy in Britain in the early 1930s to shooting Cape Fear, The Innocents, and Glory.

Here’s one of the many pearls of wisdom from Francis…

“If someone asks me, ‘I loved that shot, how did you light it?’, I’ll think they’ve lost the point. My explanation doesn’t mean a thing because there are 20 ways to light a shot and get the same result. Why you do something is far more important than how.”

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We made you! A French Maximum Overdrive (1986) poster

Maximum Overdrive french poster

“The problem with (Maximum Overdrive) is that I was coked out of my mind all through its production, and I really didn’t know what I was doing.” – Stephen King, from the 2003 book Hollywood’s Stephen King by Tony Magistrale

Stephen King’s lone directorial venture Maximum Overdrive unleashed its sentient lawnmowers, pop machines, and goblin-faced trucks upon cinemagoers back on July 25th of 1986. The film was based on a short story by King that was first published in the July 1973 issue of Cavalier magazine and later included in King’s short story anthology Skeleton Crew (1978). Like Firestarter (1984)Cat’s Eye (1985), and Silver Bullet (1985)Maximum Overdrive was shot in and around Wilmington, North Carolina and produced by Dino De Laurentiis. David Lynch’s Blue Velvet – also produced by De Laurentiss – was filming at the same time in the same North Carolina town.

Behind the Scenes: Marlon Brando and One-Eyed Jacks

OutofthePastBrando

The 1961 western One-Eyed Jacks marks the lone directorial effort of Marlon Brando. A morally bleak yet visually lush revenge yarn, the film is now considered a classic of the genre and counts among its admirers Martin Scorsese, David Lynch and Quentin Tarantino.

But at the time of its release the movie was a costly albatross for Paramount and the beginning of a downward spiral of excess by Brando that tarnished his career to the point that Francis Ford Coppola had to jump through a myriad of hoops in order to cast Brando in The Godfather (1972).

One-Eyed Jacks‘ troubled production history includes the firing of screenwriter Sam Peckinpah and original director Stanley Kubrick. Brando took over as director following Kubrick’s departure and the film’s original 12 week shooting schedule and $1.8 million budget ultimately ballooned into a six-month shoot with a $6 million price tag.

Brando’s initial cut of the film ran nearly five hours. When Paramount requested substantial changes, Brando walked away from the movie and the studio sliced One-Eyed Jacks down to two hours and 21 minutes and altered the ending to a happier one.

Below is a collection of behind the scene stills from the film. The images come from a trio of sources – the blog Cinephilia and Beyond, the website Selvedgeyard.com and the blog Fifties Westerns. Toby Roan, the gentleman behind the blog Fifties Westerns, is also working on a book about Brando’s oater titled A Million Feet of Film: The Making of One-Eyed Jacks.
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