Frame by Frame: Insecure – Season 2 (2017)

Insecure Season frame grabs

Year2017
Decade2010s
CinematographerAva Berkofsky (official site) and Patrick Cady
Director – various
Aspect Ratio1.78
DistributorHBO
GenreDrama
CameraArri Alexa
FormatSpherical

Other Key Words
Location – Los Angeles                    Short Siding                         Headroom

Further Reading
Interview with cinematographer Ava Berkofsky from Mic, which details Berkofsky’s approach to lighting the varying skin tones of Insecure


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Frame by Frame: Night Train Murders (1975)

Year – 1975
Decade – 1970s
CinematographerGabor Pogany
Director – Aldo Lado
Aspect Ratio – 1.85
Genre – Horror
LensesSpherical
Format – 35mm
Other Key Words – Video Nasties; Color (Blue); Zooms; 180 Degree Pan; Shot/Reverse Shot; Phone Calls

Click on any link for a list of other films featuring frames from that category.

“Every seat in this theater becomes a coach seat to hell!” – tagline from the Night Train Murders trailer

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Deep Fried Interview: WolfCop writer/director Lowell Dean

When David Cronenberg’s 1975 horror film They Came From Within hit screens – partially funded with taxpayer dollars by the Canadian Film Development Corporation – a Canadian national magazine famously featured the headline, “You Should Know How Bad This movie Is – You Paid For It.”

No such disclaimer was necessary when WolfCop howled its way into theaters last year. Canadian audiences knew exactly what kind of romp they were in for. After all, they helped get it made.

Both WolfCop’s $1 million budget and Canadian theatrical release in select Cineplex Odeon theaters came via the paradigm-disrupting CineCoup Film Accelerator, a 12-week contest in which nearly 100 potential feature films battled for fan votes and social media engagements to determine which received a greenlight.

WolfCop writer/director Lowell Dean spoke to Deep Fried Movies about that unique preproduction process, the benefits of using action figures to create storyboards and breaking every rule in the Coors Light product placement playbook. Continue Reading ›

An interview with Gone Girl cinematographer Jeff Cronenweth

 

“Why would you even want this? Yes, I loved you, and then all we did was resent each other and try to control each other and cause each other pain.” – Nick Dunne in Gone Girl

“That’s marriage.” – Amy Dunne

Even by David Fincher’s misanthropic standards, the jaundiced view of marriage in the director’s latest film Gone Girl is bleak. Based on the best-selling novel by Gillian Flynn, the twisting murder mystery centers on a couple (played by Rosamund Pike as the titular missing wife and Ben Affleck as her possibly homicidal husband) whose union is so festeringly rancorous that by the time the quote above is uttered it draws a laugh from audiences.

Fincher may be a misanthrope, but he hasn’t lost his sense of humor when it comes to human foibles. In Gone Girl, he swells the matrimonial acrimony until it reaches the absurd heights of pitch black comedy.

“That’s David’s sense of humor,” said Gone Girl cinematographer Jeff Cronenweth. “(He wants) laughs that, after you’ve made them, you have to ask yourself, ‘Was that appropriate for me to laugh at?'” Continue Reading ›

Deep Fried Interview: Starry Eyes cinematographer Adam Bricker

Starry Eyes

(Top) A frame from Starry Eyes. (Bottom) The behind the scenes set-up needed to create that frame. Crew members pictured are, from left to right: Best Boy Electric Christopher Faulkner, 1st AC Charlie Panian, actress Alex Essoe, Key Grip Adam Goral, Director Dennis Widmyer and 1st AD Dave Casper.

Anyone considering relocating to Los Angeles to pursue the vagabond life of the thespian should first check out the Faustian cautionary tale Starry Eyes. The lovechild of early Cronenberg and Polanski, conceived to the sounds of John Carpenter and Goblin, Starry Eyes unfolds in an L.A. of sickly greens and despondent grays. That palette comes courtesy of cinematographer Adam Bricker, who spoke to Deep Fried Movies about his work on the film. Continue Reading ›

Tales From the Crypt (1972)

Running Time: 92 minutes
Rating: PG
Who the Devil Made It: director Freddie Francis
Cast: Ralph Richardson, Joan Collins, Ian Hendry, Peter Cushing, Roy Dotrice, Nigel Patrick, Patrick Magee
Cinematographer: Norman Warwick
Studio: Amicus

A woman is attacked on Christmas Eve by an escaped mental patient dressed as Santa Claus. Now imagine that same scenario, only the woman has just murdered her husband with a fire poker. That turn of the screw defined the worldview of EC Comics’ pulp horror rag Tales From the Crypt during its run in the 1950s. The victims of the macabre morality tales usually had it coming, an idea which extends to Amicus’ 1972 anthology film version. Unsurprisingly, considering this adaptation’s British roots, that comeuppance is often inflicted upon a member of the monied class. Continue Reading ›

Deep Fried Interview: Bad Turn Worse cinematographer Jeff Bierman

The quote above slips out of the mouth of teenage bookworm Sue (Mackenzie Davis) in the first post-credits scene of the new Texas-set neo noir Bad Turn Worse. It’s followed by a 1990s-era Tarantino-ish digression on the semantics of biscuits and gravy at the fast food joint Whataburger.

Considering my affection for Thompson’s misanthropic crime novels and Whataburger’s buttery goodness, Bad Turn Worse pretty much had me at “biscuit and gravy.” However, the film took a circuitous route getting there. The Whataburger scene was shot in Los Angeles nearly a year after principal photography wrapped in Texas, part of a series of pick-ups that shaped the film into its final form. Continue Reading ›

A visual breakdown of the sci-fi western Young Ones (2014)

Director: Jake Paltrow

Cinematographer: Giles Nuttgens (check out our interview with Nuttgens here)

The Plot: Told in three chronological chapters (think American lit, not Tarantino), this sci-fi western follows the saga of a farmer (Michael Shannon) and his son (Kodi Smit-McPhee) struggling to survive the harsh lives of a drought-ridden dystopian future.

Technical Details: Shot on 35mm anamorphic film in South Africa. Nuttgens pull-processed the film to flatten out the contrast and desaturate the image and lit Young Ones’ first section with available sunlight to emphasize the harshness of the setting.

Where to See It: Currently on VOD Continue Reading ›