VHS Video Cover Art author Tom Hodge

When my dad plunked down a few bucks at a rent-to-own store to take home his first VCR, he and I christened it with a double-bill of AIP’s Frogs and Ator, the Fighting Eagle. My dad may not have had highbrow taste, but he knew a good VHS box cover when he saw one.

There are many things I no longer remember from my childhood. I can’t tell you the name of my second grade teacher. I don’t recall the make or model of our family car. But I remember Frogs. I remember Ator, the Fighting Eagle. And if you put that rent-to-own VCR in a line-up, I swear I’d still be able to pick it out, even three decades later.

That is the nostalgic sway of the VHS era for a certain generation of movie fans, a gravitational pull that swept up Tom Hodge when he made his first childhood trip to the video shoppe and came home with a copy of Tron.

A British artist known for his throwback posters of WolfCop, The Heat and Hobo With a Shotgun, Hodge shares his affection for the analog format in his new book VHS Video Cover Art, out now from Schiffer Publishing. The book brings together more than 250 pages of rare British genre covers. Hodge spoke to Deep Fried Movies about selecting those covers, finding dodgy Rambo bootlegs and what’s left on his VHS wish list. Continue Reading ›

Deep Fried Interview: WolfCop writer/director Lowell Dean

When David Cronenberg’s 1975 horror film They Came From Within hit screens – partially funded with taxpayer dollars by the Canadian Film Development Corporation – a Canadian national magazine famously featured the headline, “You Should Know How Bad This movie Is – You Paid For It.”

No such disclaimer was necessary when WolfCop howled its way into theaters last year. Canadian audiences knew exactly what kind of romp they were in for. After all, they helped get it made.

Both WolfCop’s $1 million budget and Canadian theatrical release in select Cineplex Odeon theaters came via the paradigm-disrupting CineCoup Film Accelerator, a 12-week contest in which nearly 100 potential feature films battled for fan votes and social media engagements to determine which received a greenlight.

WolfCop writer/director Lowell Dean spoke to Deep Fried Movies about that unique preproduction process, the benefits of using action figures to create storyboards and breaking every rule in the Coors Light product placement playbook. Continue Reading ›