Deep Fried Interview: Predestination costume designer Wendy Cork

If one were to imagine a “degree of difficulty” scale for costume designers, on one end of the scale you might find something like a two-character chamber piece set over the course of a single evening. Then all the way at the other end of that scale, you’d find The Spierig Brothers’ twisting time travel sci-fi Predestination (2014).

Bounding from the 1940s to the 1990s and stopping at every decade in between, Predestination taxed costume designer Wendy Cork with creating period looks for a half-dozen distinct epochs, each slightly skewed through the prism of science fiction and featuring an androgynous lead who switches genders halfway through the proceedings.

Cork spoke to Deep Fried Movies about grappling with Predestination’s preternatural degree of difficulty, looking to David Bowie and Keith Richards for inspiration and the impact of digital cinematographer on her work.  Continue Reading ›

Predestination (2014)

Running Time: 97 minutes
Rating: R
Genre: Sci-Fi
Who the Devil Made It: The Spierig Brothers
Cast: Ethan Hawke, Sarah Snook, Noah Taylor
Screenplay: The Spierig Brothers
Cinematographer:
Ben Nott
Budget: $9 million
Tech Info: Shot on Arri Alexa
Where Can I Find It: Here

The Plot: Based on the 1960 Robert Heinlein short story “All You Zombies” (which you can read in its entirety here), Predestination stars Ethan Hawke as a time-traveling crime fighter whose latest assignment finds him in a 1970s New York dive bar being regaled with the unbelievable life story of a strangely androgynous customer.

Ramblings: Ethan Hawke has joked that he wanted the advertising tagline to read “Predestination: Go Fuck Yourself.” Once you’ve unraveled the film’s time-is-a-flat-circle mind-screwery, you’ll get the joke. It’s the latest from the Australian directing duo The Spierig Brothers, whose last film Daybreakers (2009) used a futuristic vampire plot as the armature on which to build an allegory of the rich literally feeding off the poor. Predestination is another high-concept genre flick with something on its mind, a “period piece” sci-fi traversing six decades to touch upon ideas both social (gender roles and patriarchy) and philosophical (to simplify, “What came first, the chicken or the egg?”).
It’s an utterly singular film that rather depressingly played in only 20 theaters.

Continue Reading ›