Pic of the Day: Rambo posters by Italian artist Renato Casaro

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Today’s pic features a pair of posters from one of my favorite artists Renato Casaro, who in his long career created movie ads for James Bond, Schwarzenegger and Stallone, and Italian legends Dario Argento, Bernardo Bertolucci, and Sergio Leone.

Further reading: Film on Paper’s interview with Casaro

Shot Behind the Shot: Enter the Dragon (1973)

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(Above, top – photo by David Friedman) On the set of Enter the Dragon (1973), cinematographer Gilbert Hubbs frames a handheld shot with the metallic claw of villain Shih Kien in the foreground during the climactic final showdown with Bruce Lee. Lee completed only four starring roles before his death at the age of 32 – with the posthumously released Enter the Dragon being the last.

The behind the scenes pic above comes from a photo spread on the website of American Cinematographer Magazine. You can also buy the 2013 issue of the magazine featuring an Enter the Dragon retrospective on the publication’s website for just $1.

For more in the Shot Behind the Shot series, click here.

Interview: Gotham cinematographer Crescenzo Notarile

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Check out this interview I did for Filmmaker Magazine with Emmy-nominated Gotham cinematographer Crescenzo Notarile ahead of tonight’s Season 3 premiere on Fox. Notarile talks about Gotham’s signature style, the challenges of hiding lights from the show’s wide-angle lenses, and what he learned from working on Sergio Leone’s Once Upon a Time in America.

Here’s Notarile on Once Upon a Time in America cinematographer Tonino Delli Colli.

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Behind the scenes of The Departed (2006)

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A collection of set stills from Martin Scorsese’s Oscar-winner The Departed (2006). These are just a few pics featured in a collection posted on the Facebook page of American Cinematographer Magazine. All the images were snapped by unit photographer Andrew Cooper. The suspender-sporting gray haired gentlemen in the pics is cinematographer Michael Ballhaus, who collaborated with Scorsese on After Hours, The Color of Money, The Last Temptation of Christ, Goodfellas, The Age of Innocence, and Gangs of New York.

Pic of the Day: From Here to Eternity (1953)

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(Above) French-language poster for Fred Zinnemann’s 1953 Best Picture winner From Here to Eternity, an advert immortalizing Burt Lancaster and Deborah Kerr’s adulterous oceanside kiss. The film is based on the 1951 debut novel of James Jones, which features some autobiographical elements from Jones’ time stationed in Hawaii on the eve of World War II.

Here’s Zinnemann on concessions made to the Army in order to receive its cooperation in making the film. From the book Fred Zinnemann: Interviews:

Certain things the Army objected to, particularly two things. One, the inside of the stockade. The book contained many scenes showing the rough life inside the stockade. The Army said that if that was shown, there would be no cooperation. The second point was the character of the captain, Deborah Kerr’s husband, who was ineffectual and a bad officer. The Army wanted to see the man get his comeuppance and be courtmartialed and forced to resign. In the book he was promoted to major.

Now the whole point then became: is it worth making that sort of arrangement? I felt that it was. As it turned out, I was sure that it was not necessary to go into gruesome details about the inside of the stockade, because one could see in the escape and the death of Sinatra sufficient proof for what was going on inside and leave room for the audience’s imagination.

I personally would’ve liked to see the captain being promoted, because it was a fine sardonic touch. But it was a sacrifice that had to be made.