Pic of the Day: Polish poster for Rocky (1976)

Polish Rocky poster by Edward Lutczyn

(Above) Edward Lutczyn’s Polish poster art for the original Rocky. If you’d like to binge watch Rocky Balboa’s transformation from doughy underdog to swole defender of the American way, the first five entries in the franchise are now streaming on Netflix. This poster is currently up for auction through this weekend over at Heritage Auctions.

Check out more Pics of the Day.

Before and After VFX: Avengers Endgame (2019)

In honor of Avengers: Endgame hitting Blu-ray today, here’s a few behind the scenes shots from Captain America’s time-traveling mano a mano versus himself. Photos via The Art of VFX’s interview with Endgame visual effects producer Carlos Ciudad.

To illustrate how the volume of effects shots in a Marvel Cinematic Universe extravaganza has expanded, here’s Marvel co-president Louis D’Esposito from the book Marvel Studios: The First Ten Year:

We started with 487 (visual effects shots) on Iron Man (2008) and finished with 823. For Avengers: Infinity War (2018) it’s over 3,100. That’s almost every shot.

The Shot Behind the Shot: Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (2019)

Behind the scenes Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

A few set-ups from the new film adaptation of the popular 1980s kids horror anthology books written by Alvin Schwartz and illustrated by Stephen Gammell.

Directed by André Øvredal (Trollhunter, The Autopsy of Jane Doe) and produced/written by Guillermo del Toro, the movie attempts to faithfully recreate Gammell’s unsettling monsters via practical effects (meaning actors in ghoulish costumes) rather than CGI. Below you’ll find the movie’s take on The Red Spot and The Dream.

To hear del toro and Øvredal talk about the creation of each monster, check out this story from Vulture.

More in the Shot Behind the Shot series

Behind the scenes Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Behind the scenes Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Behind the scenes Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

Panavision’s Dan Sasaki talks customizing lenses for Once Upon a Time In Hollywood

In my newest interview for Filmmaker Magazine, Panavision Senior Vice President of Optical Engineering Dan Sasaki talks being a second-generation member of the Panavision family, the storied history of the C Series anamorphics, and personalizing lenses for cinematographer Robert Richardson for use on Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time In Hollywood.

Here’s an excerpt:

Filmmaker: Do you have a favorite set of lenses that you wish got rented out more?
Sasaki: Oddly enough, I cannot say that I have encountered a situation in which any particular series has gone unnoticed or underutilized. The amount of content [being made now] has created a bit of a renaissance in which the art of cinematography has evolved into an adventure that I have not seen the likes of in my history at Panavision. Cinematographers are figuring out ways to maintain their authorship and carry their intent throughout the entire imaging chain. That includes experimenting with every type of lens we carry.

The Shot Behind the Shot: Once Upon a Time In Hollywood (2019)

Behind the scenes of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

(Above, photo by Andrew Cooper) Shooting an action scene from a fictional Rick Dalton flick in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time In Hollywood. The behind the scenes pic is featured in the August issue of American Cinematographer magazine, which includes interviews with DP Robert Richardson, colorist Yvan Lucas, and gaffer Ian Kincaid. The story is currently only accessible in the print edition, but if you’re interested in such things I highly recommend subscribing. A two-year digital subscription is only $50.

Here’s Richardson on the film – his sixth with Tarantino – from the American Cinematographer piece:

“It’s about mortality, about the recognition of when we slowly begin to fade from a place in the spotlight to somewhere else. [It’s also] a celebration of a time period in Hollywood that was shifting – as Quentin has said, it is his love letter Hollywood.”

Check out more in the Shot Behind the Shot series here.